• SAMS UoA

#7 UMAT

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED 5/5/2018

Hey fam! Gentlest reminder that UMAT registration closes in approximately a month from now - 1 June, 2018. It costs a hefty 260 Australian Dollars. It’s not a fun test, but it’s a necessary one. Many people apply because it provides them the option to apply for Medicine as you’ll find not everyone is 100% sure of what they’d want to do in the future! We’ve detailed the tiniest blog about the UMAT along with a little checklist you can refer to closer to test day.


For those wanting to apply for MBChB, a pre-requisite is to sit this test: the “Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admissions Test” (UMAT) https://umat.acer.edu.au/ . This test is run by ACER: the Australian Council for Educational Research. They actually provide heaps of details on their website for UMAT and we strongly advise you literally scour through the entire website and read the relevant sections through:

https://umat.acer.edu.au/about-umat

https://umat.acer.edu.au/register

https://umat.acer.edu.au/prepare/

https://umat.acer.edu.au/sit

Be sure to click on the different tabs on the left-hand side panel.

I would like to draw your attention again specifically to the “Prepare” section which has 4 more sub-sections: “Preparation strategy”, “Preparation materials”, “Test taking strategy”, and “FAQ about preparation materials”. It would be very good to read them thoroughly!


The main thing I’d advise is to:

  • Be very familiar about what sort of questions they’ll ask; so read that “prepare” section carefully

  • Practice speed reading… (there’s a lot of words in that test - you’ll need to learn how to read very fast…)

Now, assuming you’ve read all that ;) just gotta address the fact that there are plenty of other UMAT prep services out there. A lot of which cost hundreds if not thousands of dollars. I can assure you that with just the automatically provided prep materials provided by ACER, I scored pretty respectably. All I went through was the prep materials given by ACER, read it thru a few times; did the practice tests as if real tests - and did meself proud. To each their own.


Now, also, I hope you’ve read about this, or just realise these two things (we’ve covered before in our previous entry in this link):

The University of Auckland takes raw score, not percentile score - so chill out about the test!

UMAT is not indicative of how good a medical practitioner one might be. In fact, there are calls from the medical community to remove UMAT as a contributer to medical admission.


Lastly, below’s a checklist for preparing for UMAT. We’ll post this up again closer to the date because it’s really not important right now; but I guess it’s just nice to know there’s a checklist out there somewhere….!

(It’s paraphrased from our 1st Year FAQ here: link)

  1. Check if you have a Sem 2 lab clash with UMAT. If you do; e.g. MEDSCI 142, BIOSCI 106; etc. all you’ll need to do closer to the date is just email your course coordinator and tell them about it and they’ll give you an alternate lab stream to go to.

  2. Get a run-up of consecutive regular good night’s sleep.

  3. Plan your UMAT day. Here’s a short checklist for you :)

  • your transport (e.g. there is free parking at Vodafone Events Centre, but it takes FOREVER to get in or get out in the cars because heaps of people drive); or public transport - trains, take the SOUTHERN or EASTERN line etc etc (Google's your friend)

  • bring an umbrella / rain coat & comfy shoes if you're travelling by public transport because the train station is quite far away from Vodafone Events Centre... ~20mins walk**

  • make sure you know whether you're in the AM or PM stream for UMAT

  • allow plenty of time to travel

  • bring enough food AND WATER

  • print out your admission ticket

  • bring your Driver's License / adequate form of ID

  • bring your writing equipment

  • your A game

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